Mika Hannula : Tell It Like It Is

Writer, curator and art critic, Mika Hannula, presents his book ‘Tell It Like It Is – Contemporary Photography and the Lure of the Real’, as part of TalkSeePhotography’s workshop series. Hannula explores our understanding of contemporary photography through the discussion with and engagement of four Scandinavian lens-based artists: Mads Gamdrup, Annika von Hausswolff, Esko Männikkö and Vibeke Tandberg.

 

Alec Finlay – a-ga : on mountains

Artist and poet Alec Finlay presents his exhibition ‘a-ga : on mountains’, which consists of a selection of poems and a series of wooden blocks, a letter on each, arranged in such a way they spell the name of a mountain. Finlay explores the continuous relationship between art and language, the meanings behind the names of these mountains and their association with poetry or art.

Alec Finlay is an Edinburgh based artist whose work often explores society’s relationship with the landscape, and presents work in a variety of media such as sculpture, video, poetry and collage, among others.

a-ga : on mountains is currently on at the Sleeper Gallery, Edinburgh.

Ryan Nicodemus : Everything That Remains

Ryan Nicodemus talks to Writer Stories TV about his journey from materialism to minimalism at this year’s Edinburgh Independent Radical Book Fair. With his friend, Joshua Fields Millburn, Nicodemus explored the movement Minimalism and what it could do to help change their lives. They created the idea of the 30 Day Minimalism Game, which consists of throwing away one item on day one, two items on day two, so on and so forth. The idea is to partner up with a friend, family member, colleague etc, and see who can make it to 30 days.

Find out more about the Minimalists at http://www.theminimalists.com/

Cathie Devitt : Don’t Drink and Fly

Author Cathie Devitt introduces her new book, Don’t Drink and Fly, the first novella in a three part series exploring the life of Glasgow-based witch, Bernice O’Hanlon. On a quest to find happiness, Bernice makes her way through the ups and downs of life, not always getting it right as she goes.

Cathie Devitt is a writer and a Laughter Yoga leader. Devitt has written short stories, poetry in anthologies and plays, as well as articles for various publications. For Don’t Drink and Fly, Devitt explores the Pagan traditions and the world of witchcraft to help inform her book.

 

Elaine Henry : Edinburgh Independent Radical Book Fair 2014

The 18th Edinburgh Independent Radical Book Fair – the alternative international book festival – will take place from Wednesday 22 to Sunday 26 October 2014 in Out of the Blue Drill Hall. Around 70 publishers will be displaying books ranging over a variety of topics from cooking and crochet, to alternatives to capitalism and debate about the current political establishment. As well as selling books, the fair will also have a number of events by writers and activists.

Find out more at http://www.word-power.co.uk/viewEventList.php?category_id=1

Audrey Dakin : The Patrick Geddes Centre

Audrey Dakin, project officer at the Scottish Historic Buildings Trust, discusses the Trust’s fundraising campaign to transform Riddle’s Court into The Patrick Geddes Centre for Learning and Conservation. So far, £5m has been raised, but there’s still a further £600,000 to go. The aim is to create a resource centre that is based on the educational ethos evolved from Sir Patrick Geddes Vivendo Discimus – By Living We Learn.

As well as receiving monetary donations, the Trust has also received a beautiful paper sculpture from the anonymous sculptor, who has been creating intricate paper works since 2011.

 

Institute of Local Television launches the free ‘Parallel University’

The Parallel University is a response to an increased volume of student demand for training/mentoring in skills that are relevant for work in the new small-scale TV broadcasting and web based TV industries. This includes platforms providing access to news and commentary via social media feeds such as Facebook and Twitter, as well as dedicated TV sites supported by YouTube or Vimeo.

From its Summerhall HQ, ILT will run a course of forty hours in duration (running part-time over three or so months and to suit student availability) to fine-tune TV skills among students studying TV and Journalism, in preparation for work in local and community TV. Students will get the opportunity to make 8 clips, 2-3 minutes in length. To successfully graduate the student’s TV clips will need to be accepted for screening on one of several approved .tv sites, and/or local TV (initially NvTv in Belfast).

Each 2-3 minute clip will follow a simple template or pattern comprising interview(s) and cutaways. Some clips will be time-critical. Production and editing will be expected to take less than four hours while for time-critical interviews filming, editing and publishing will be completed over the course of a single day.

The primary objective of the course is to bring student TV-making practices up to speed with increasing social demand (in Scotland) to generate alternative sources of TV news and cultural documentation.

ILT’s Director, Dr David Rushton, has been involved with local and community of interest film and TV making since 1979. Rushton taught TV and Communication Policy at Queen Margaret University from 1990-2000, establishing Channel Six Broadcasting Ltd in 1999 with Local TV Masters graduates who ran Edinburgh Television and Channel Six Dundee until 2003. Rushton has long been an advocate of local broadcasting in local hands and his doctorate concerns the demands for an as-yet un-realised local public service television. He has written regularly on applying the principle of subsidiarity to broadcasting in Scotland.

Courses will take place at the Institute of Local Television’s offices at Summerhall, Edinburgh.

For more information, please contact Institute of Local Television on 07906 692506 or local.tv@virgin.net

Smári McCarthy : Crowdsourcing the Constitution

Technologist and political activist Smári McCarthy talks about the constitutional process Iceland went through after its financial crisis in 2008. Speaking at an event at Summerhall with Bella Caledonia, an online magazine, which explores ideas of independence, autonomy and self determination, McCarthy explores the history of Iceland’s constitution, the efforts by the public to change it after the financial crisis, and how aspects of it could relate to what’s happening in Scotland now.

 

Francis Spufford and Ken Macleod : Writers Together

It’s a landmark day for Scottish political and social history. The Scottish Independence Referendum has spurred a record number of the Scottish public to register to vote, and it’s all to play for at this stage. Will Scotland become an independent country? Will the Union stay together? Only time will tell.

Writers Francis Spufford and Ken Macleod hold a panel discussion attempting to make, in their words, an ambitious, progressive, utopian case for keeping the union of Scotland, England and Wales.

http://kenmacleod.blogspot.co.uk/

Glenn Patterson : Scottish Independence: Irish Consequences

“Scottish Independence: Irish Consequences” National Library of Scotland, Edinburgh. Thursday 22nd March 2012

Into the final week of the Scottish Independence Referendum campaign, we thought we’d dig out this panel discussion, which took place at National Library of Scotland, Edinburgh, on the Thursday 22nd March 2012.

The idea behind the panel was to bring together four leading Scottish writers and four eminent Irish counterparts to discuss Scottish independence, the experience of the Irish Republic and the potential impact of a Scottish break-away for Northern Ireland.

Chair: Neil Mackay, Head of News, Sunday Herald
Participants: Louise Welsh, James Robertson, Allan Massie, Ewan Morrison, Glenn Patterson, Thomas McCarthy, Alan Gillis, Anne Devlin

Thomas McCarthy : Scottish Independence – Irish Consequences

“Scottish Independence: Irish Consequences” National Library of Scotland, Edinburgh. Thursday 22nd March 2012

Into the final week of the Scottish Independence Referendum campaign, we thought we’d dig out this panel discussion, which took place at National Library of Scotland, Edinburgh, on the Thursday 22nd March 2012.

The idea behind the panel was to bring together four leading Scottish writers and four eminent Irish counterparts to discuss Scottish independence, the experience of the Irish Republic and the potential impact of a Scottish break-away for Northern Ireland.

Chair: Neil Mackay, Head of News, Sunday Herald
Participants: Louise Welsh, James Robertson, Allan Massie, Ewan Morrison, Glenn Patterson, Thomas McCarthy, Alan Gillis, Anne Devlin

Louise Welsh : Scottish Independence – Irish Consequences

“Scottish Independence: Irish Consequences” National Library of Scotland, Edinburgh. Thursday 22nd March 2012

Into the final week of the Scottish Independence Referendum campaign, we thought we’d dig out this panel discussion, which took place at National Library of Scotland, Edinburgh, on the Thursday 22nd March 2012.

The idea behind the panel was to bring together four leading Scottish writers and four eminent Irish counterparts to discuss Scottish independence, the experience of the Irish Republic and the potential impact of a Scottish break-away for Northern Ireland.

Chair: Neil Mackay, Head of News, Sunday Herald
Participants: Louise Welsh, James Robertson, Allan Massie, Ewan Morrison, Glenn Patterson, Thomas McCarthy, Alan Gillis, Anne Devlin

Lidia Krzynowek : Polish Scottish Heritage Festival

Lidia Krzynowek, Director of the Polish Cultural Festival Association, introduces the heritage festival that takes place at Summerhall. Featuring a mix of talks, events and exhibitions, the festival aims to explore the cultural link that has existed, and continues to develop, between Scotland and Poland.

Find out more about the association at http://www.scotpoles.co.uk/index.html and http://polishscottishheritage.co.uk/

Liz Carruthers : MacBheatha

Director Liz Carruthers introduce’s Shakespeare’s classic text about power and obsession, Macbeth. Translated into Gaelic, this two person performance shows the bloody and cruel path to power taken by Macbeth and Lady Macbeth.

Liz Carruthers was born in Edinburgh and has been a theatre director for over 25 years. Liz is currently Artistic Director of Open Book, and has previously been a Scottish Arts Council Trainee Director at Perth Theatre, Staff Director at Chichester Festival Theatre and Artistic Director of Cumbernauld Theatre.

As a freelance director, her work has been seen at the Citizen’s Theatre, the Tron, the Traverse, Assembly, The Arches, Gilded Balloon, Pitlochry Festival Theatre, The Purcell Rooms, Soho Theatre, The Gate, The Duke’s Head (Richmond) and touring venues all over Scotland and England.

Find out more at:
http://www.white-stag.co.uk/
http://www.madeinscotlandshowcase.com/

Edinburgh International Book Festival 2014

Every year the brightest and best of literary talent makes their way to Edinburgh to take part in the largest book festival in the world. Decamping in Charlotte Square, the festival becomes a centre for debate and discussion about all things cultural and relevant to everyday life.

We make our yearly pilgrimage to this site to soak up the literary goodness that resides here, and grab one or two authors for a quick chat about their work. You can see our findings in the Archive section on the Home page of the site, and gain an insight into what goes into writing a short story, poem or novel.

 

 

 

 

Matthew Zajac : Factor 9

Matthew Zajac from Dogstar Theatre Company introduces their play Factor 9, which centres around the contamination of NHS blood leading on to thousands of haemophiliacs receiving infected blood, and many developing Hepatitus C and HIV. It is considered to be the greatest medical disaster of our time, and this play explores the impact it had on those affected by it, and questions why it even happened in the first place.

Kerry Hudson : Edinburgh International Book Festival 2014

Hackney based author Kerry Hudson talks about her work at this year’s Edinburgh International Book Festival. Her first novel, TONY HOGAN BOUGHT ME AN ICE-CREAM FLOAT BEFORE HE STOLE MY MA was winner of the Scottish First Book Award and has been shortlisted for the Southbank Sky Arts Literature Award, Guardian First Book Award,  Green Carnation Prize, Author’s Club First Novel Prize and the Polari First Book Award.

Fiona MacInnes : Iss

Set in Orkney and Edinburgh from the 1950’s to the closing decades of the 20th century, this novel is a moving and compassionate evocation of life in a small fishing community and the struggle to find one’s place and a sense of self at a time of political and cultural upheaval.

Nort Atlantik Drift : A Portrait of Robert Alan Jamieson

Filmmaker Susan Kemp’s portrait of Robert Allan Jamieson, Shetland novelist and poet. Filmed over a period of weeks in the remote West Shetland crofting township of Sandness where Jamieson grew up, the film is a lyrical and inimate insight inro the author’s youth and particular experience in living and leaving such a close community.

Susan Kemp’s film is based on his collection of poems ‘Nort Atlantik Drift’, described by Jamieson as originally intended ‘for my three sons, a record of who their father might be and who he once thought he might be. But as with life, the narrative developed in ways I didn’t foresee’.

The same could be said of the film as less than a week before filming began Alan’s father died at the age of eighty-four – as with life, the narrative of the film developed in ways Alan could not have foreseen.

Writerstories.tv meets Alan at the first Shetland showing of the film in Sandness on Friday 29th August as part of Screeplay, Shetlands Film Festival

Lesley McDowell : Unfashioned Creatures

Lesley McDowell talks about her book Unfashioned Creatures, which centres around the life of Isabella Baxter Booth, who was the real-life childhood friend of Mary Shelley. Booth was said to be ‘disturbed in her reason’, and it’s this idea, and the treatment of women and mental health in the 19th Century, that McDowell explores in her book.

Lesley McDowell is a literary critic for The Herald, The Scotsman and The Independent on Sunday, and author of books Between the Sheets: Nine 20th Century Women Writers and their Famous Literary Partnerships (2010; ‘full of juicy details’, New York Times Book Review, shortlisted for Scottish Book Awards 2011 Non-fiction), and The Picnic (2007).

 

Philip Caveney : Seventeen Coffins

Author Philip Caveney has been writing since the late 70s, primarily for adults but he now writes for children. His best known books are the Sebastian Darke adventures ,which are about a hapless would-jester, and his miserable side-kick, Max.

Caveney talks about his book Seventeen Coffins, a tale of mystery as Tom Afflick (Crowboy, 2012) is plunged back in time to the late 1820s where a series of unexplained disappearances occur. Afflick finds himself trying to escape the vengeful pursuit of bogus plague doctor, William McSweeney.

Paul Gravett : Comics Unmasked

Paul Gravett is a journalist, curator, lecturer, and broadcaster, who has worked extensively in comics since the 80s. Gravett talks about  the exhibition he set up at the British Library, which explores the libraries vast collection of comics and comic artwork. A great success, the exhibition pulled in the biggest number of visitors, and received a great deal of press coverage in the run up to the opening.

A L Kennedy : All the Rage

A.L Kennedy’s work includes novels, short stories, drama, non-fiction and journalism for a variety of UK and overseas publications. Kennedy talks to WriterStories TV from this year’s Edinburgh International Book Festival, about her collection of short stories.

A.L.Kennedy was born in Dundee in 1965. She is the author of 15 books: 6 novels, 6 short story collections and 3 works of non-fiction. She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature.
Her new book “All The Rage” – a collection of short stories – was published by Jonathan Cape in spring 2014.

Marcus Sedgwick : Edinburgh International Book Festival

Author Marcus Sedgwick discusses his writing process, his illustration work and collaboration. His work spans across many genres, and he’s written titles for children, teenagers and adults. Sedgwick’s work has been awarded the Printz Award, the Booktrust Teenage Prize and the Blue Peter Award, as well as being nominated for the Carnegie Medal and the Edgar Allan Poe Award.